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Hornby R2706 The Flying Dutchman Train Pack Royal Sovereign + 3 coaches Limited Edition No 2000 OF 2000 Box View
Hornby R2706 The Flying Dutchman Train Pack Royal Sovereign + 3 coaches Limited Edition No 2000 OF 2000 Locomotive Front Side Track View
Hornby R2706 The Flying Dutchman Train Pack Royal Sovereign + 3 coaches Limited Edition No 2000 OF 2000 Alternative Locomotive Front Side Track View
Hornby R2706 The Flying Dutchman Train Pack Royal Sovereign + 3 coaches Limited Edition No 2000 OF 2000 Separated Front Side Track View

The Flying Dutchman Royal Sovereign

The Flying Dutchman Royal Sovereign Dean Single 3 Clerestory Coaches Limited Edition DCC ready R2706
Stock Level: 1
Part Number: Hornby R2706
Array
£169.99
Our Price: £169.99
Description

Hornby R2706 The Flying Dutchman Train Pack Royal Sovereign + 3 coaches Limited Edition

Prototype:

The name Flying Dutchman has a convoluted history. In common with many steam and diesel engines such as the LNER A1's and BR class 55 Deltics, the Flying Dutchman was named after a famous racehorse, which had won both the Derby and St. Leger in 1849. The racehorse was in turn named after the famous Dutch Admiral Tromp. In 1845 the 09:30 morning express train between London Paddington and Exeter was taking 5 hours with stops at Didcot, Bath, Bristol and Taunton, this being reduced to 4½ hours during that year. In 1848 the train, now the 09:50 from London Paddington, covered the 53.1 miles to Didcot in 55 minutes, setting a world record start-to-stop average of 57.9mph. The return train was the 11:45 from Exeter. In 1849, the Train took on the name "Flying Dutchman” and added a stop at Chippenham without extending the overall journey time. The up-train time was changed to 12:30 which gave an arrival at Paddington of 17:00. In the 1850's performance deteriorated, but the introduction of a service from London Waterloo to Exeter in 4¾ hours by the LSWR in 1862 resulted in the down Flying Dutchman being retimed to leave Paddington at 11:45 with the 1840's journey time of 4½ hours being restored. This was, however, a brief interlude and soon the time to Exeter has stretched to 5 hours and 5 minutes. At this time the train left Paddington with 7 coaches. Two were detached as Swindon; one for Weymouth and the other for Cheltenham, and after detaching 2 more at Newton Abbot for Torquay the remaining three coaches worked through to Plymouth. By 1867 things had got so bad for the GWR that the Flying Dutchman ceased running, being cancelled in October of that year.

Information: A total of 79 Dean Achilles Class Single wheelers built between 1891 and 1899 for express passenger services out of Paddington by the Great Western Railway. Built during the period of conversion to standard gauge, the first thirty members were built with a 2-2-2 wheel arrangement, with the first eight also featuring convertible frames with the eminent demise of the broad gauge infrastructure.

Details: Typical of conventional engineering during the late 19th century, speed meant large driving wheels on a single driven axle. The Achilles Class featured enormous 7’-8-1/2” diameter driving wheels with two internal cylinders between the frames. Also typical of the era was the original 2-2-2-wheel design. The 2-2-2 locomotives being later converted to the familiar 4-2-2-wheel arrangement after an accident involving a broken axle in Box tunnel during 1893. The broken axle shaft was blamed on front end weight associated with the larger boilers being used on the class.
As express passenger locomotives the class took on individual names. Livery was GWR lined green. Several class members were allocated to Royal Train duties. No. 3065 “Duke of Connaught” made a record-breaking run with the “Ocean Mail” on 9th of May 1904, covering the distance from Plymouth to Paddington in 227 minutes.
Engineering of steam locomotives took a tremendous leap forward in the early twentieth century resulting in many rebuilds. Consideration of converting the design to a 4-4-0-wheel arrangement by George Churchward was considered during the early 20th century; but not pursued due to difficulties associated with converting the frames because of the large driving wheels, resulting in withdrawal of the entire class between 1908 and 1915. All were scrapped.

 

Dean Single Achilles Class

  • Class:                Dean Single Achilles Class
  • Type:                Steam
  • Designer:           William Dean
  • Weight:             50 tons (not including tender)
  • Purpose:            Mixed Traffic

 

Product Identifiers

  • BRAND             Hornby
  • MPN                 R2706

Product Key Features

  • Train Operating Company     Great Western Railway
  • Material                              Plastic, Pressed Steel
  • Control                               Analogue
  • Colour                                Green, Brown, Black
  • Year                                   2008
  • Era                                     Era 2 - Pre-Grouping (1875 - 1922)
  • Power Supply                      DC
  • Features                             Limited Edition Number, Mixed Lot
  • State of Assembly                Ready to Go/Pre-built

 

Contents:

Royal Sovereign Dean Single Wheeler Number 3050

Two GWR Third Class Clerestory and One Clerestory Brake Corridor Coaches number 1895, 1896, 2085.